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A video tour of Rolling through the Bay

15
Apr/11

Here is Scott narrating the multiple "tours" or ping-pong ball paths that run through his amazing toothpick sculpture. I love how personally meaningful every little detail is, and Scott's quirkiness and passion for his work comes through in this video. Come see Scott in person on Saturday during Open MAKE: Wood!

Dear Mr. Weaver,

We went to the Exploratorium and saw your magnificent toothpick city. We never thought that someone could make something so amazing with something so ordinary. The sculpture was extreme - toothpicks and ping-pong balls pushed to the limit. I loved how it was a piece of scenery with a ping-pong ball rolling through it on a track that is part of the picture. It was of San Francisco's finest places in one piece of art. The show was very entertaining. I wanted to see it again and again. It was like one of those things where you look at it a million times and always see something new.
after we saw the fine art we had questions like...
- Are there different toothpicks from different countries?
-How many paths are there on the sculpture?
-What is each path like.
-Are there any smaller models like that? If so, what are they like?
Thanks for listening!
Sincerely,
Dominic Dal Porto

Dear Dominic,

Thanks so much for your comment and your questions! I'm very happy you've enjoyed Scott's piece, and agree it's something inspiring. Scott does not spend much time with computers and the internet, so I don't think he'll be by to directly answer your excellent questions, but I'll ask him. In the meantime, here's what I know about the piece (some of it can be briefly seen in the video above):

- There are different toothpicks from different countries! Especially in the area representing the Golden Gate Park and the old DeYoung museum: there are several plant from different countries, each made with toothpicks that actually come from that country.

- I believe there are 8 separate starting points, some of which converge further down.

- Watch the video tour above, I think that's the best way to see what each path is like. It's really hard to film it, as most of the action takes place deep inside of the sculpture!

- Yes there are: Scott built a toothpick hat that has a smaller model of San Francisco, but still will take a ping pong ball on a mini tour of the city...

Scott will also give an interview today at the Exploratorium, which will be webcast live, and later on archived, so check back on this page for a link to that video.

Cheers,
Luigi

Dominic, Thank you for your wonderful comments. Your enjoyment is why I did it. You can enjoy it on youtube. CNN, WIRED, and KTEH have done nice videos on it and myself on mydriveway is ok. Thanks again, Scott

WOW ! Scott's narrative and the marbles' tours through the work is as amazing as the piece itself . He brings the structure to life and draws you in in ways you could never do on your own, by just looking at it. performance pure! love it!

Here's one of the videos that Scott mentioned -- it's one of my favorites because it shows him working on his sculpture with his favorite tool -- a toenail clipper tricked out with skateboard tape to give it better grip. I'm always interested to see how Makers modify tools to suit their needs. This is a perfect example of that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mt4m44Tpl3U

-k

WOWthis is awesome great job on the construction.

Awesome

Wow to describe it does not do this justice. Mr. Weaver you created a masterpiece! Having grown up in San Francisco this by far is the one of the greatest things created to honor this wonderful city. Your dedication and obvious care for this great piece of art shows and I want to thank you and cannot wait till I can take my kids to see this!

Wow, Scott, this is simply amazing! And your descriptions in the video are wonderful. Thanks for sharing this with the world!

Scott, Tell us when you'll be at the Exploratorium again next. It was nice to meet you and see the sculpture. I'd like to bring some friends to meet you.

Impressive work! I enjoyed the narrated tour, it helped foster an increased appreciation for what is already an extraordinary bit of workmanship, creativity, dedication, attnetion to detail, and understanding of the laws of motion. I'm not sure there is a superlative worthy of describing this, or my amazement.

Thank you, Mr. Weaver, for the hard work and the willingness to share so personally.

This is Incredible. Your voice has a strong resemblance to Kenny Powers.

Scott,
We were roommates back in San Rafael back in the 80's. I knew you were creative when we were playing frisbee and hacky sack at McNears, but this is CRAZY! Thanks so much for sharing this with everyone. It is awesome. I hope you and your family are doing well.

Remarkable! When all the world around us seems to be shattering, you are pulling one little piece of it into order, joy, and extravagance. Gee. YOUR gripping story and intricate toothpick maze of our renowned San Francisco made my day. Thank you, thank you, thank you, Scott!!!!!

Scott Weaver's work is so detailed and wonderful. A perfect match for the Exploratorium a place in town that does it like no other. Nice job!

Too much Free time Mr. Weaver?
Anyways...Great job (:

This piece is magnificent. Unbelievable.
I have a question about its longetivity. How can you preserve it? over time does the artist worry it might sag under its own weight? What are the structural supports? Has he ever considered a polyurethane coating or would that just add weight?
Thank goodness it is preserved on film but this belongs in the Smithsonian so future generations can see it.

is one allowed to download the video and how would one go about it? I only have dial up access at home so can only see it if I go to a free wi-fi site. It is SO AWESOME! My daughter lives near San Fran and got quite a kick out of it too.

*poke*

very creative work. extraordinary. you are really thinker. :)

We read an amazing book about you. We really love the sculptures you made. It was cool and fun seeing the pictures. We hope we can see more sculptures. We can't believe how hard you worked to make the sculptures. You did a good job. In the book Rolling Through the Bay looked small, but in the video it looked big and amazing.

We would like to know a few things. How many toothpicks did you use to make Rolling Through the Bay? How do you make the toothpicks smaller? Also, how do you make the toothpicks curve?

Have a good day!

It's hard to know exactly how many toothpicks were used, but Scott estimates that there are more than 100,000 toothpicks in the sculpture. For answers to your other questions, check out this companion video:

https://vimeo.com/22866993

Enjoy!

this tothpick sculptuer is so amazing and we like the trails your amazing!

Hello Mr. Weaver!
Yesterday in our reading group, we read your book, Scott Weaver Toothpick Sculptor. We thought the book was awesome and we were excited to see this sculptor in action. Thanks for sharing your amazing creation with us!

That was awesome

Dear Mr. Weaver,

We read the book Scott Weaver: Toothpick Sculptor in class, and we watched your video tours of the marble runs that are part of your Rolling Through the Bay sculpture. We thought the pictures in the book were awesome, and we enjoyed watching the balls roll through the marble runs in the sculpture. We have a few questions for you.
1. What year did you make your first toothpick sculpture?
2. How big was your first toothpick sculpture?
3. What did you mean when you said you "left your heart in San Francisco"?
4. How many toothpicks did you use in your Rolling Through the Bay sculpture?

Thank for showing us how the video of the marble runs!

Sincerely,
Austin, Miana, Tramain, Ethan, and Mrs. Davis

We Loved the book, Scott Weaver Toothpick Sculptor. We loved seeing the San Fransisco landmarks. Our favorites were, the bridge and The Palace of Fine Arts. We think you are amazing!!

I like your sculpture. It was cool!!!!

I really like your art work. Do you give tours based on your art work?
How do you do work with toothpicks? Do you give lessons?

I read your book and I thought it was amazing how it took 3,000 hours and you worked on it for 30 years! The video was awesome. I loved how the ping pong balls rolled through all different parts of your sculpture.

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